Belated Baystate Marathon summary, training notes

So the marathon was the Sunday before last, Oct. 18.  Monday launched me into another extremely busy week at work, and it wasn’t until Friday night that I finally sat down to write a bit of a race report.  Now it’s after nine p.m. on Monday night and I’m finally getting back to it.  Basically, the training I described in my last post worked. I ran at the pace I planned to, despite the rain, the wind and cold.  I ran with my friend and training partner Curt and we hung together for the whole race, changed up the lead to when the wind was blowing hard to give each other turns to draft, and finished side by side at 3:13:19(18). It was not only a PR, but also a Boston Marathon qualifying time. I was happy.

Never hit the wall: nutrition and hydration notes

Our splits were even give or take a few seconds over all the miles, and I never hit the wall.  By mile 22 or 23 I was tired, no surprise, and my quads were starting to burn, but otherwise I felt fine.  No massive glycogen depletion bonk.  Beyond the training, I attribute this to three days of carbo loading. Not overeating at any meal, but taking extra pasta or carbs and less meat with both lunch and dinner. Polenta and pasta the night before.  And then three fried eggs and toast on race morning. I ate one of Kris’ amazing homemade sugar cookies right before my warmup run. Then took three 100-calorie packets of Gu over the first 16 miles. Then another sugar cookie at mile 19. Alternated Gatorade and water at every other water stop.  (I’ve finally gotten so I can cruise through these and drink from those little cups without losing my pace. I squeeze the top of the cup together, makes a little spout to sip from.) I’d worn my Fuel Belt, but only carried one of the four 8 oz water bottles it holds – mostly as a token. Really I wanted it for the pouch to hold Gu and cookies.
The cold: not an issue
It was about 40 and raining, with wind at the end, but the cold was never a factor during the run. I wore shorts, baseball-style running cap to keep the rain out of my eyes, ultra-light gloves and a long sleeve, winter-weight compression shirt.  I was never cold until I stopped at the finish line. Then, like everyone else, I began to shiver.  Body temperature dropped fast.  None of us were in the mood or condition to hang around in the rain post race. I was happy I’d already run Hyannis in exactly the same weather, and happy that several of my long training runs had been in the pouring rain.  You get used to it, and realize that it doesn’t have to have any effect on your pace. The wind is another story.
Training runs: Max distance 20.5 miles
I never ran more than 20.5 miles or so in one training run. And I didn’t do a lot of super fast speed or interval work. My program focused much more on a high volume of medium fast, medium long runs – tempo and lactate threshold work. One 16-20 miler on the weekends, many times with most of big chunks of miles at race pace. Then a couple of medium long 10-14 mile runs during the week, usually at night after the kids were in bed.  One at aerobic pace, one at tempo pace.
Friends and family
And that’s it. It was a great run and I was happy and tired afterward. It was good to have a friend to train and run with, and good to have all our families there at the end. I was, as always, deeply grateful to Kris for supporting the whole idea of all this training, of coming to see me race, and feeling like it was important for the kids to come.  She’s much tougher than I am. And it was sweet of the kids to hang out in the rain and cold and still be happy to see me at the end – a sweaty, drenched, shivering daddy with the strangest sense of what constitutes fun.
PS
Oh yeah, I registered for Boston 2010 yesterday.  Sub-3:10 maybe?  Either way, woo hoo!

So the marathon was last Sunday.  Monday launched me into another extremely busy week at work, and so last, after another loooong day of writing code, running data imports, working on budgets and a variety of other non-running but still vital tasks, followed by dinner with Kris and the kids stories afterward, I finally sat down to write a bit of a race report.  That was Friday.  Now it’s nine Monday night and I’m finally getting back to it!  Basically, the training I described in my post last week worked. I ran at the pace I planned to, and that my training paces and distances had been aimed at, and despite the rain, the wind and cold.  I ran with my friend and training partner Curt and we hung together for the whole race, changed up the lead to when the wind was blowing hard to give each other turns to draft, and finished side by side at 3:13:19(18). It was not only a PR, but also a Boston Marathon qualifying time. I was happy.

Never hit the wall: nutrition and hydration notes

Our splits were even give or take a few seconds over all the miles, and I never hit the wall.  By mile 22 or 23 I was tired, no surprise, and my quads were starting to burn, but otherwise I felt fine.  No massive glycogen depletion bonk.  Beyond the training, I attribute this to three days of carbo loading. Not overeating at any meal, but taking extra pasta or carbs and less meat with both lunch and dinner. Polenta and pasta the night before.  And then three fried eggs and toast on race morning. I ate one of Kris’ amazing homemade sugar cookies right before my half-mile warmup run. Then took three 100-calorie packets of Gu over the first 16 miles. Then another sugar cookie at mile 19. Alternated Gatorade and water at every other water stop.  (I’ve finally gotten so I can cruise through these and drink from those little cups without losing my pace. I squeeze the top of the cup together, makes a little spout to sip from.) I’d worn my Fuel Belt, but only carried one of the four 8-oz water bottles it holds – mostly as a token. Really I wanted it for the pouch to hold Gu and cookies.

The cold: not an issue

It was about 40F and raining, with wind at the end, but the cold was never a factor during the run. I wore shorts, baseball-style running cap to keep the rain out of my eyes, ultra-light gloves and a long sleeve, winter-weight compression shirt.  I was never cold until I stopped at the finish line. Then, like everyone else, I began to shiver.  Body temperature dropped fast.  None of us were in the mood or condition to hang around in the rain post race. I was happy I’d already run Hyannis in exactly the same weather, and happy that several of my long training runs had been in the pouring rain.  You get used to it, and realize that it doesn’t have to have any effect on your pace. The wind is another story.

Training runs: Max distance 20.5 miles

I never ran more than 20.5 miles or so in one training run. And I didn’t do a lot of super fast speed or interval work. My program focused much more on a high volume of medium fast, medium long runs – tempo and lactate threshold work. One 16-20 miler on the weekends, many times with most of big chunks of miles at race pace. Then a couple of medium long 10-14 mile runs during the week, at night after the kids were in bed.  One at aerobic pace, one at tempo pace.

Friends and family

And that’s it. It was a great run and I was happy and tired afterward. It was good to have a good friend to train and run with, and good to have all our families there at the end. I was, as always, deeply grateful to Kris for supporting the whole idea of all this training, of coming to see me race, and feeling like it was important for the kids to come.  She’s much tougher than I am. And it was sweet of the kids to hang out in the rain and cold and still be happy to see me at the end – a sweaty, drenched, shivering daddy with the strangest sense of what constitutes fun.

PS

Oh yeah, I registered for Boston 2010 yesterday.  Sub-3:10 maybe?  Either way, woo hoo!

Follow me!